Sewage treatment is the process of removing contaminants from wastewater, primarily from household sewage. The separation and draining of household waste into greywater and blackwater is becoming more common in the developed world. Greywater is water generated from domestic activities such as laundry, dishwashing, and bathing, and can be reused more readily. Blackwater contains human waste.

Effect Of Water Pollution

Sewage is a major carrier of disease (from human wastes) and toxins (from industrial wastes). The safe treatment of sewage is thus crucial to the health of any community.

Water pollution is very harmful to humans, animals and water life. The effects can be catastrophic, depending on the kind of chemicals, concentrations of the pollutants and where there are polluted. Below is themajor effects of water pollution:

  • Various Diseases
  • Destruction of ecosystems
  • Death of aquatic animals
  • Disruption of food-chains

The basic principle of the working of a biological treatment plant is decomposition of the raw sewage. This process is done by aerating the sewage chamber with fresh air. The aerobic bacteria survive on this fresh air and decompose the raw sewagewhich can be disposed off in the sea

sewage

PROCESS FLOW DIAGRAM

STAGE ONE: SCREENING

Screening is the first stage of the wastewater treatment process. Screening removes large objects like, trash, tree limbs, leaves, branches, and other large objectsthat may block or damage equipment.
Special equipment is also used to remove grit that gets washed into the sewer.

STAGE TWO: PRIMARY TREATMENT

This involves the separation of organic solid matter (or human waste) from the wastewater. This is done by putting the wastewater into large settlement tanks for the solids to sink to the bottom of the tank. The settled solids are called ‘sludge’. At the bottom of these circular tanks, large scrappers continuously scrape the floor of the tank and push the sludge towards the center where it is pumped away for further treatment. The rest of the water is then moved to the Secondary treatment.

STAGE THREE: SECONDARY TREATMENT

The water, at this stage, is put into large rectangular tanks. These are called aeration lanes. Air is pumped into the water to encourage bacteria to break down the tiny bits of sludge that escaped the sludge scrapping process.

STAGE FOUR: FINAL TREATMENT

The ‘almost’ treated wastewater is passed through a settlement tank. Here, more sludge is formed at the bottom of the tank from the settling of the bacterial action. Again, the sludge is scraped and collected for treatment. The water at this stage is almost free from harmful substances and chemicals. The water is allowed to flow over a wall where it is filtered through a bed of sand to remove any additional particles.

The filtered water is then released into the river.